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MidWest-IX/FD-IX announces our newest member DiviNetworks

We are please to announce the newest member of our Indianapolis fabric. The following is a little about DiviNetworks from them.

 

DiviNetworks is now offering a new and interesting way for any ISP to generate additional revenue from its existing infrastructure without any investment. This is achieved by securely sharing your IPv4 address space and some minimal bandwidth with the company enterprise customers. The income you can expect mainly depends on the amount of IPs you will be sharing, but a rough estimation would be around $2.5 per year per each IP shared. So if you have for example around 4096 IPs, you can expect around $10,000 per year.

Some commonly asked questions:

What is a Shared IP?

DiviNetworks has developed a method that allows making use of the user IPs in your system in parallel, without latency. Principally, it is similar to the way NAT is working, but on all the IPs in your network. Technically, if you are using Mikrotik router, deploying a simple configuration in the router achieve this. The configuration includes two main definitions. First, it creates a GRE tunnel between the router and the company cloud servers. Then, it marks all the connections that come from the tunnel, and apply a rule on your WAN interface, so all the returned traffic from the internet which belongs to these marked connections will be routed back through this GRE. Using this method, there is no need to allocate dedicated IPs for this service. You can continue to serve your customers and enjoy additional revenue from the same IPs.

So, this sounds too good to be true… where is the catch?  Well, actually there isn’t one.  Divi’s customers are enterprises who need IPs to simulate real users’ traffic from all over the world (currently they have over 100 ISPs in their network), so there is need for more ISP’s for this reason. Each ISP by itself is not able to provide enough coverage, since it does not have the geographical distribution required for the service.

What are the potential hazards, or in other words, how we can be sure that the IPs are not used for illegal activity, and how can we make sure they are not blacklisted?

Divi’s customers are well known corporations (no individual is allowed to use the system). DiviNetworks conducts a strict KYC process with each potential enterprise customer who wishes to use the system, including personal identification of the representative. In addition, only web traffic toward ports 80 and 443 is allowed, with DiviNetworks keeping full logs of all the requests being made through all the servers, including the customer’s real source IP.

All the logs of the traffic passed through the ISP partners are available to the ISP for download and it is kept for 12 months. Each of our partners receive a login to a real time monitoring system where they can see various information about the traffic passed through their router by the DiviNetwork’s customers, including domain names, total bandwidth etc.

In addition, all the traffic, which is sent or received through your router, is passed through one of the company main Pops where it is being monitored using anti-DDoS and anti-malware systems to ensure that no abnormal traffic is generated. The DiviNetworks system also ensures that the traffic pattern is similar to a normal user, to provide another layer of safety.

DiviNetworks is happy to discuss additional monetization products for WISPS as well as their flagship enterprise product and how it assists their clients who make use of it for competitive market research, QoE for large companies, and ad verification. DiviNetworks is excited about expanding its reach in North America as they have done globally.

If you would like more information on DiviNetwork please visit http://www.divinetworks.com/

Our St. Louis fabric is growing

Check out our peers on our St. Louis peering fabric.
https://www.peeringdb.com/ix/1519

#keeptrafficlocal

Chicago Colo update

You may have seen our Chicago colo post ( https://www.midwest-ix.com/blog/?p=155 ). Here are some revised prices, based on the increasing scarcity of power in the facility.

1/2 cabinet, 1.5 kw $1,600
10u, 5a, $1,200
4u, 2a, $500
2u, 1a, $300
1u, 0.5a, $175

* Additional 0.5a is $75 each.

IOS-XR Example Config

;
; REPLACE X with your appropriate FD-IX IP Address
;
; REPLACE Y with your appropriate IP blocks
;
; REPLACE 1234 with your ASN
;
; Route Server addresses are specific for Indy. Other locatins will need to be modified

interface TenGigE0/1/0/7.300
description "Midwest IX Peering"
ipv4 address 206.53.139.X 255.255.255.0
ipv6 nd suppress-ra
ipv6 address 2001:504:45:f3e8::X/64
encapsulation dot1q 300

community-set MidwestIX_Transit
8008:13681
end-set
!

prefix-set PS_Long_Masks
0.0.0.0/0 ge 25,
::/0 ge 33
end-set

prefix-set PS_Bogons_v4
# Default
# 0.0.0.0/0,
# Broadcast Messages to Current
0.0.0.0/8 le 32,
# RFC1918
10.0.0.0/8 le 32,
# RFC990
127.0.0.0/8 le 32,
# RFC3927
169.254.0.0/16 le 32,
# RFC1918
172.16.0.0/12 le 32,
# RFC5736
192.0.0.0/24 le 32,
# RFC5737
192.0.2.0/24 le 32,
# RFC3068
192.88.99.0/24,
# RFC1918
192.168.0.0/16 le 32,
# RFC2544
198.18.0.0/15 le 32,
# RFC5737
198.51.100.0/24 le 32,
# RFC5737
203.0.113.0/24 le 32,
# RFC1112 (Multicast)
224.0.0.0/4 le 32
end-set
!
prefix-set PS_Bogons_v6
# Unspecified address
::/128,
# Loopback to Localhost
::1/128,
# IPv4 Mapped Addresses
::fff:0:0/96,
# IPv4/v6 Translation
64:ff9b::/96,
# Discard Prefix RFC 6666
100::/64,
# Teredo Tunneling
2001::/32,
# ORCHID
2001:10::/28,
# ORCHIDv2
2001:20::/28,
# Documentation and Sample Space
2001:db8::/32,
# 6 to 4
2002::/16,
# Unique Local Addressing
fc00::/7,
# Link Local Addressing
fe80::/10,
# Multicast
ff00::/8
end-set

route-policy RP_Deny_Bogons
if destination in PS_Bogons_v4 or destination in PS_Bogons_v6 then
drop
else
pass
endif
end-policy
!
route-policy RP_Deny_Long_Masks
if destination in PS_Long_Masks then
drop
endif
end-policy
!
route-policy RP_Transit_MidwestIX_In_v1
apply RP_Deny_Bogons
delete community all
set community CS_Any_Transit
set community CS_MidwestIX_Transit additive
pass
end-policy
!
route-policy RP_Transit_MidwestIX_Out_v1
apply RP_Deny_Bogons
apply RP_Deny_Long_Masks
if community matches-any CS_Any_Transit then
drop
else
pass
endif
end-policy

router bgp 1234
bgp router-id Y.Y.Y.Y
!
neighbor-group midwest-ix-peers
remote-as 13681
timers 30 90
update-source TenGigE0/1/0/7.300
enforce-first-as disable
session-open-mode active-only
address-family ipv4 unicast
route-policy RP_Transit_MidwestIX_In_v1 in
route-policy RP_Transit_MidwestIX_Out_v1 out
next-hop-self
remove-private-AS
soft-reconfiguration inbound always
!
!
neighbor-group midwest-ix-v6-peers
remote-as 13681
timers 30 90
update-source TenGigE0/1/0/7.300
enforce-first-as disable
session-open-mode active-only
address-family ipv6 unicast
route-policy RP_Transit_MidwestIX_In_v1 in
route-policy RP_Transit_MidwestIX_Out_v1 out
next-hop-self
soft-reconfiguration inbound
!
!
neighbor 206.53.139.2
use neighbor-group midwest-ix-peers
Description Midwest Route Reflector 1
!
neighbor 206.53.139.3
use neighbor-group midwest-ix-peers
Description Midwest Route Reflector 2
!
neighbor 2001:504:45:f3e8::2
use neighbor-group midwest-ix-v6-peers
Description Midwest Route Reflector 1
!
neighbor 2001:504:45:f3e8::3
use neighbor-group midwest-ix-v6-peers
Description Midwest Route Reflector 2
!

Member Spotlight: On-Ramp Indiana (AS: 14333)

MidWest-IX is starting a new series to highlight our exchange members.  This will be an ongoing series to highlight what companies on the exchange can offer.

 

On-Ramp Indiana (ORI.NET) ASN 14333 is a full-service internet provider and IT consulting company located in Noblesville, Indiana.   Their primary services are Fixed Wireless Broadband, Fiber-Based Internet, Server Co-Location, Cloud Server Hosting, Data Center Services, and Wireless LAN/WAN Deployment and Consulting.   ORI is a Microsoft Office 365 partner with considerable expertise in the Microsoft Exchange email platform.   ORI.NET also is a provider of website hosting and corporate email solutions.

Their broadband Internet is available throughout the Indianapolis Metropolitan area, including Indianapolis, Plainfield, Carmel, Fishers, Noblesville, Westfield, Pendleton, Ingalls, Cicero, Arcadia, and Sharpsville.   Their fixed wireless broadband offers several options to cover residential, small business, all the way up to mission-critical enterprise applications.      Their dedicated fixed wireless uses the latest licensed enterprise wireless, providing fiber replacement, fiber supplement, and fiber alternative to area businesses and multi-tenant buildings.    Speeds of a gigabit or faster are available!   They maintain a presence in 3 Indianapolis Data Centers, which allows for flexible and competitive offerings for companies looking to co-locate servers obtain local cloud-based services, or work with a trusted website and corporate email hosting provider.

We here at ORI.NET have found several advantages to being a FD-IX exchange member.    Our broadband subscribers represent tens of thousands of content consumers, and having access to that content without leaving the data center saves money on transit costs, as well as providing a lower latency and optimal path for the best customer experience.     Since we host approximately 1000 websites and 10,000 email users, we also see quite a bit of traffic originating from FD-IX to access our network content as well.     Keeping traffic local just makes sense for ORI from cost, performance, and redundancy perspective.   The benefits keep growing as each new member joins the exchange.

On-Ramp can be contacted at sales@ori.net, 317-774-2100, or via their website at http://www.ori.net.

Real World Indianapolis network

Today we bring you an example of one of our networks in Indianapolis. This network has a single upstream transit connection and a connection to MidWest-IX.  Under their MidWest-IX connection, they have a couple of direct peers and are peered with the route servers.  The following graphs illustrate their traffic flows for the past 2 days.

The stats break down like this:

Total network consumption: Roughly 1.2 Gigabits at peak
Total offload to MidWest-IX: approximately 400 megs at peak.
Total left to Transit: approximately 800 megs at peak.

This network is offloading approximately 1/3 of their traffic onto MidWest-IX.  This traffic experiences lower latency than if it were to go over the transit connection along with other benefits.

Would you like lower latency traffic to over 25 peers? Contact MidWest-IX today.

Google (AS36040) joins us in St. Louis

Google ‘s AS36040 has joined us in St. Louis.

MidWest-IX seeks Sales leader

MidWest-IX is looking for a motivated self-starter to head our sales team.  We are looking for a motivated self-starter who can help us close deals.  This position is a part-time commission based with a draw to start with.  Opportunity to move into more for the right candidate.  This job is ideal for a retired or semi-retired telecom sales executive.   You will be selling our exchange products as well as complimentary products from partner companies.

Duties
-Collaborates with executive team on leads
-Follow up with clients from start to finish
-Suggests strategy relative to sales and sales process

Requirements
-Familiarity with Internet concepts such as peering and interconnection.
-Basic familiarity with how networks work
-Strong communication and interpersonal skills
-Ability to follow client through full sales life cycle.

Please send resumes and contact info to support@midwest-ix.com for more details. Preference given to markets we operate in with greater preference on Indianapolis.

 

Speedtest.net Updates – June 2017

I know I said I’d be doing this monthly and that I haven’t. Quite a few things are more important than doing blog posts about speedtest.net tests, so the post has been delayed.  🙂

For all time as of this evening, our fastest download was from Indiana University at 934,629 kilobits/s, while our fastest upload was 924,221 kilobits/s from iQuest Internet. These were both done on a PC. We’re assuming the GigE to the server is the limitation here. Hopefully in the next month that’ll be rectified. I think they need to add some more precision to their latency test as we have a few dozen tests with 0 ms of latency. Either those were broken tests or they were done in the Indianapolis area. A couple do say they were done in Indianapolis, so I suppose it is possible. Otherwise we do have a TON of 1 ms tests in Indianapolis to take the cake.

As far as mobile devices, we’ve got several entries via the Android app from Smithville Digital that are over 800 megabits/s, but don’t list a connection type. Are there Android devices with GigE ports? Excluding those, the fastest is still with Android at 463,434 kilobits/s download on Indiana Fiber Network and 605,892 upload also on Indiana Fiber network. Those were obviously both done over Wi-Fi. If we exclude Wi-Fi (and things that look to be Wi-Fi, such as LTE from a provider that doesn’t do LTE), the king of the heap is Sprint on Android at 215,149 kilobits/s for download and AT&T Android at 50,396 kilobits/s. The lowest latency from a mobile device was a 1 ms iPhone on Cogent. Filtering out WiFi and obviously broken tests, we have 24 ms on Verizon Android. We do have some lower iPhone tests, but they seem to be too low to be valid.

Now, the fun stuff. Who’s the worst? That’s hard to say we have a bunch of 0, 1, 2 kilobits/s tests from mobile devices, both on LTE and WiFi. We assume those were all due to signal issues. There were no obvious points to separate bad signal from usable signals for either platform in either direction. For PC based tests, we at least were able to get up to 14 kilobits/s down (Frontier in Valparaiso) and 3 kilobits/s up on Altius in Alexandria. The worst latency was 3,579 ms to an iPhone on AT&T U-Verse. Think mobile devices being slow is obvious? A PC from Smithville Digital didn’t do much better at 3,056 ms.

Open-IX statement updated

MidWest-IX has updated our Open-IX statement for Indianapolis.

https://www.midwest-ix.com/support/openix.html

 

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